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history. i concentrate on tie lan and vietnam. >> host: why is it important for students to know southeast asian history. >> guest: united states is still very much engaged in that corner of the worldment we have many alis and partners we're working with, and many students, midshipman, are going to be officers who are going to go to southeast asia and represent our interests there. so i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the culture and have some knowledge of their history. >> host: well, professor ruth. one of our long-time allies is thigh taken, and you have written a book called "in buddha's company: thai sole soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thailand was a close ally of the united states during the vietnam war. many people who are official with the circumstance good-familiar with the circumstances of she vietnam, but not only thailand sent troops but also served as a base for many of the aircraft that were flying, bombing missions over laos and south vietnam. at the time we had built seven air bases and
authors. .. >> "in buddha's company" thai soldiers in the vietnam war" what warded did thailand play? >> they were a very close ally during the vietnam war. people familiar would know that not only did thailand send troops to fight along the united states, but also served as a base for many aircraft for bombing missions over ho chi minh trail, over laos and at the time we had built seven their bases and developed a port as well to facilitate the u.s. effort and also many soldiers went to bangkok and in terms of support thailand was the close ally. >>host: did they have soldiers? >> absolutely. they spent 37 -- cent to 37,000 soldiers to fight in vietnam also they sent smaller naval units but definitely fighting and working with the united states and south vietnamese. >>host: what about casualties? >> 500 + that died in south vietnam while fighting the the it can't -- vietcong. it is important because of those who don't know 10 to dismiss them as the insulting term is america and mercenaries be
return to vietnam to return a notbook he took from a soldier he killed during the north vietnam war. >>> joining us now on booktv is author and professor wayne karlin who most recent book is "wandering soul." professor karlin who was homer? >> he is a friend of mine who retired living in north carolina. he was a officer platoon leader in the vietnam war. and he had contacted me a number of years ago because i had some contacts in vietnam vietnamese i had been working with, he had taken a documents and a book from the body of an vietnamese soldier he killed during the war. and wanted to see if he could find a family and return those documents to this them. >> why. he had gone through decades of ptsd, not only because he killed that man, he had a rough war, he killed many people he had seen many of his own men killed, went through a lot of the pat earns that people tend to go through with post-traumatic stress, an adrenaline junkie. he wrecked card, he -- cars, had had a hard time forming relationships. he got married kind of late and his wife was a army brat and seen he was going thr
polarization, urban riots, vietnam, rock concert and woodstock and so on and i became convinced that you really shouldn't talk about the 60's, 1960 to 1970 but something where the 60's start somewhere around 1965 which is what i've done. >> did you realize that at the time? did you feel your world change? >> guest: i mentioned in the preface to this book that i started teaching at indiana university in september of 64. there was my first job after getting my doctor at and i was busy preparing courses and my wife and i had a son in december, 1964, so i wasn't paying a whole lot of attention to what was going on in the world but it became impossible of course at the university campus not to be aware of the tension and delusions which were developing. while they were not particularly severe indiana university in 1965 it certainly became that way within a couple of years and they did on other campuses such as michigan which had the first teach and in march of 1965 a big rival of indiana you begin to see a lot changing. the students being addressed individually, much more, some of them at least, muc
voting rights act, the summer race riots and the deployment to vietnam. he discusses the year with the word university modern history professor scott. .. >> they like to talk about the 20s our the '90s and sometimes it works. in the thirties you can do that but mostly it does not work or the 60 is. if you look back to the early '60s through 64 or the kennedy assassination, so much of daily life and popular culture, politics the way people dress seem like the '50s. with the '60s we think turmoil, urban riots riots, vietnam, rock concert its in dae became convinced of you should not talk about them where the sixties start which is what i have done. >> did you feel your world change around do? >> a little bit. i started teaching 1964 and i was very busy preparing courses. we have assigned december 1964. i was not paying a lot of attention to what was going on but was impossible on a university campus not to be aware of those that were developing a. well not particularly severe they became that way in a couple of years and in march of 1965 arrival of indiana students begin to dres
of the voting rights act come the summer race riots in troop deployment to vietnam. he discusses the divisive year with howard university modern history professor, daryl scott. >> host: hello, jim. it is my pleasure to be here to discuss her new book, the eve of destruction, how 1965 transformed america. as you know, we historians love to ask one another how it became the issue decided to write about a given topic. what brought you to read about 1965? >> well, i cut 20th century 19th century history for a number of years, mostly at brown university. as we move through this thing, i started doing this in the 60s, so i didn't teach the 60s because it was in history. later on an important part of my courses and i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60s. like a lot of other historians, i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the 60s can be described as something 1960 to 1970. historians like to do this. they like to talk about the 30s or or the 20s or the 90s and so forth. sometimes it works. in the 30s you can do that because of depression throughout the deca
riots. vietnam. rock concerts, woodstock, so forth and so on. and i became convinced you really should not talk about the '60s as 1960 to 1970, but something where the '60s start somewhere around 1965, which is what i've done. >> host: did you realize that at the time? did you feel your world change around you in 1965? >> guest: a little bit. i mentioned in the preface of the book that i started teaching at indiana university in september 1964. my first real job after getting my doctorate. and i was very busy preparing courses, and i also -- my wife and i had a son, december of 1964. so i was not really paying a whole lot of attention to what was going on in the world. but it became impossible, of course, and at a university campus particularly, not be aware of the tensions and divisions which were developing, and while they were not particularly severe at indiana university in 196 5 they became that way in a couple years, and they did on other campuses, especially marx with the first teach-in in march of 1965. a big ten rival of indiana. you begin to see a lot changing. the students
vietnam and conflicks where we weren't as aware of recognizing their needs? >> you know, that's one of the great things, i so much admire about this current generation, not -- in addition to the soldiers and sailors, also the american people. you know, when i came back from war in 1969, it wasn't a happy event. many of us took off our uniforms and went home in civilian clothes. today, the soldiers get on first, when go to an airport, total strangers shake the hands of a young soldier in uniform. when a solar comes home from war, he is honored by his neighbors and schoolmates and organization. this is a jeoperational shift. i think it is one of the most remarkable things about our society, that today we respect and admire soldiers more than we have ever in our history. >> jamie: everyone here at fox is so grateful. please, stay with us. the president is making his way to the ampitheater, where we will hear his remarks live. we'll take a quick break and we'll be right back: but because of business people like you, things are beginning to get rolling. and regions is here to help. makin
for peace in vietnam." it's about 40 minutes. [applause]? >> wow, how do you live up to the introduction? thank you so much, max. it's great to be here today. lie before i begin i would like to y thank the folks at the library of congress for letting tme pai of this wonderful event. so i'm sure everyone here in this tent would agree with you t when i say memory. although this year marked what president obama declaredded as the 50th anniversary of the start of that war, it doesn't seem like the conflict started a half century ago, but the war is recent, kept alive by constant references with the result of hollywood films like the ones max lifted or national headlines eluding to comparison with the war in afghanistan, and, indeed, my own new york times op-ed called exploding myths about vietnam appeared last month. it's a shameless plug for an article i wrote. the vietnam war feels very present. this is not surprising. the war, arguably america's longest war, shook the foundations of society. it reached into nearly every american home through military service, through participation and pr
. >> the coast guard and vietnam. the coast guard played a significant role in the war in vietnam. whether you remember it that way or not, we'll tell you how some veterans are being honored today. thank you for helping.. as e raise money for the americad cross and victims of hurrice sandy.. and no >> we raise money for the american red cross and victims of hurricane sandy and now victims of the nor'easter, as well. and to donate, call the number on your screen, 1-888-5-helps- u. "...we got through the first one, we can get through anything",, [ female announcer ] this is a special message from at&t. [ male announcer ] it's no secret that the price of things just keeps going up. [ female announcer ] but we have some good news. it's our bundle price promise. [ male announcer ] a price you can definitely count on, for two whole years. from at&t. [ female announcer ] a great price for a great triple-play bundle. [ male announcer ] call now. bundles with u-verse tv, internet and home phone start at $89 a month. now get the same great price for two years. [ female announcer ] switch today and get a
of new jobs. >>> still ahead in this half hour a soldier story, a vietnam vet comes to washington to honor the men he left behind. >> only a couple degrees higher today but without the wind, it felt more pleasant. officially 58 and 39 go in the books, averages still 61 and 43, record high 79 and the record low 26. we'll come back, talk about the weekend, let you know if the 70s are still headed our way. >> plus new york finds a way to help ease long lines at the gas pump, those stories and more just ahead. >>> it's good if you have an odd license plate in new york city on this first day of gas rationing in new york city and long island. cars are supposed to fill up on alternate days and so far it appears to be working. >> i think it's great. it's moving great. >> i've been in line hours before this odds and evens. now the line is only five minutes long. >> so new jersey started rationing last weekend after superstorm sandy disrupted fuel deliveries and created long lines at the pump. state officials say they are suing several stations for price gouging. some owners were charging
act, voters rights act and we haven't even begun to get close to vietnam. i would like to ask mike to talk about ladybird's contributions to the country, not as separate, but certainly, her own project. >> the most fruitful year of lbj's presidency was 1965. i have in my office at the lbj library, a shadow box of lpg used to sign the bills into law during that year. the elementary and secondary education and higher education act, which is a profusion of federal money that is going into education. you see high school graduations. enrollment of college rise, dramatically as a result of this. 60% of all student loans today are derived not higher education. the same year, medicare, the arts and humanities act, which creates the national endowment for the arts. the clean air act. the most important civil rights act in our history. it gives people of color power of the ballot and the immigration act, which opens the gates and our borders people all over the world and fundamentally changes the face and heart of america. this is in one single year. i will tell you is a presidential histori
star. >> one was 94 years old. the other served in vietnam. >> this sunday is veterans day. today, two veterans, one of world war ii, one of the and on, finally got the metals they deserved. -- vietnam, finally got the they deserve. >> is given because you put your life in harm's way to defend your country. >> at a special ceremony at fort meade, senator barbara mikulski awarded the bronze star, a long overdue, to two maryland veterans. >> on april, 1945 -- >> dr charles was a captain in the army medical corps at the battle of the bulge. >> i have no knowledge of planning anything. i was lying in the road and i realized another grenade had gone off nearby. betsy repeatedly exposed himself to small arms, and the -- >> he repeatedly exposed himself to small arms in order to move forward to help wounded shoulders. >> charles was an army medic in vietnam. >> i figured we had bought the farm. everybody went up to that hill. the jets were dropping their bombs. the enemy fired at us. i got hit in my arms and legs. >> for these men, it is not just an honor for themselves, but for the man they
the good guys. i have traveled the world now. i continue my education as an infantryman in vietnam. made a lot of movies, some of them about history. and i have learned a lot more about what i once knew. and when i heard from my children what they're learning in school, i was perturbed that they were not getting the more honest view of the world and i did. we lived most of our lives in a fog. but i will let my children to have access to something that looks beyond what i recall as the tyranny of now. >> material now. tavis: the you think a 10-part series on showtime, a companion book, they can start a conversation about the history of their nation? >> sure, and i am proud that showtime put this on. this does not use again on american television. but they are very proud of it and it gets repeated and repeated. we have foreign showings of it. hopefully, one day, it will be a text in a school. it deserves to be. it is better than my daughters text, which is apparently the ninth edition. >> and the book is getting widely distributed. it is being sold in costco, wal- mart, sam's. tavis: texas
is the people we lionize, the soldiers of world war ii, they were the people became the generals of vietnam. the we rightly demonized. they're the same men. the difference is, world war ii, there was accountability. in world war ii, success was rewarded, the failure was punished. nobody knows -- first american commander in the african european in the army in world war ii. he was fired. a bunch of other generals were fired. they were replaced by names -- in 1940, dwight eisenhower was lieutenant-colonel on the west coast. george marshall picked him out and said that is the type of guy i need and began promoting these guys. we do not have leadership these days. instead, we have a parade of generals go into iraq. mediocrity, not doing much. coming home feeling entitled to a promotion. that is what has happened to the military over the last 50 years. tavis: what is at the epicenter of this -- 11 commanders, what is the source of that constant turnover? >> the source is something that does worry me. when you have a nation, it democracy, that fights wars and does not pay attention to them. we had
. >>> still ahead on 9, a touching love story of two vietnam vets. an officer and a nurse who lead parallel lives until a phone call brings them together. >>> also ahead, some say the republican party much change or die. why in this case change could be hard. >>> top. >> high temperatures 58 today. still a little below average. here is a look at the wake up weather. it's going to be a chilly start no doubt. 35-44 by 8:00. and by 10:00, most folks will be back in the 50s. we'll come back and put the finishing touches on the weekend fore. >>> all right. as we head into the break, here wh'so ecl oumi byb cese? 'sheas -wh! lahi ] t'thtay 0%atal tt cesth - o tnkou ..oewhev yoreoi. inbabechse omheauinco ha y lgh tay en ttazi qsoreo th scyicofhitl r rh,rey st at35incari aed, ue eeo due eryasbi e ugngowhee. ha y lgh tay >>> well, there are those who suggested the republican party is in dire straits following its losses in this week's presidential election. tonight derek says the gop's difficulties are almost certainly overestimated, but the party is in a perplexing predictment. >> most people reme
of the vietnam veterans memorial, and that's where we find abc 7's richard lee tonight. richard? >> well, pam, this certainly is a busy place. folks still arriving here at the vietnam veterans memorial. you may be able to see the statue way back in there. now, you may recall the design was initially controversial. now all these years later, it is a powerful connection. of love, loss, and honor. ♪ >> ♪ o say can you see ♪ >> a day of honor. >> i can give this date in memory. >> a time of remembrance. >> veterans day is showing appreciation to each other. and probably the biggest return of the memorial. >> at a sacred place they call the wall. >> can't believe it's 30 years since we dedicated the memorial. >> on a certain weekend it draws thousands, a simple, yet poignant design, 58,261 names etched in stone. there's no rank. there's just a name. you don't even have branch of service, you know. the sacrifice is the same no matter whether you're a private or a general. >> for vietnam veterans like bill, the names are also faces from a long ago war, now
troops fighting in iraq. >>> the vietnam veteran's memorial continues to be one of the areas most visited sight. today is no exception as surae chinn talks to those who gathered at the wall. >> i see them twice a year for memorial day and veteran's day. >> the walk moves people none like no other. antonio biaz has come to honor his fallen comrade. >> for all those who are no longer with us. >> reporter: army specialist biaz was only 20 years old while in combat. >> he flew a couple of planes in front of me. we met and got separated then. >> reporter: his friend would be killed by a land mine at the age of 21. a salute for a fallen friend. a tribute song to a soldier. and faces of young men who never got to grow old. >> to pay respects to all of those that have given their ultimate sacrifice on their wall. all my brothers and friends. >> reporter: they make the annual trek to the wall that bring them right back to the battlefield of vietnam. >> and they were killed on september 26 in 1968. >> reporter: a tough journey of reflection, but one that these soldiers will never miss on veteran's
in the bay area today. the sound that brought back memories of the vietnam war. they see themselves as ,,,,,,,,,, did you know dentures are ten times softer than natural teeth and can be easily scratched? they may also have surface pores, where odor-causing bacteria can grow. that's why dentures require special care. make polident® part of your daily routine. polident's unique microclean formula cleanses gently. it releases antimicrobial agents, including active oxygen, to kill ninety-nine-point-nine percent of odor causing bacteria and reduce plaque. for a cleaner, fresher, brighter denture, use polident® everyday. this has been medifacts for polident®. some of the forgotten men of forgotten men of the vietnam war. more than one hundred s got together today to tell r stories. cbs makovec on t >>> they see themselves as some of the forgotten men of the vietnam war. more than 100 vets got together today to tell their stories. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec on the role the coast guard played in vietnam. >> reporter: and with the sound of a huey chopper, memories of the vietnam era cam
of a soldier, a graduate of yale, landed in vietnam in october 1968 and was placed in charge of 1st platoon, charlie company, 1st battalion, 4th marine regiment. one year later he came home with two purple hearts, the navy cross, the bronze star, ten air medals, and memories that screamed at him. in the late '90s he asked the veterans administration for help and began treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. two years ago he published a novel. he had been working on it ever since he came home from vietnam. "matterhorn: the story of a yung second lieutenant leading a rifle platoon of 40 marines on a remote jungle hill." critics called it "a powerhouse -- tense, brutal honest," "unforgettable," "moving and intense." karl marlantes has now written a second book, a nonfiction memoir and meditation on what it is like to go to war. read it and you will be closer than you can imagine to the mind and heart of the warrior in battle and after. karl marlantes, welcome. >> it's nice to be here, thank you. >> i haven't been sure about how to start this interview. i've never been to war. i've never
conflicts, the vietnam war. national correspondent steve centanni is live for us in washington. steve? >> hi, harris, at the vietnam memorial today, he said each soldier who served in vietnam includes himself, came home a changed person n a lesser ways, a visit to the vietnam memorial can also change a person, i was there today. everybody has a vietnam memorial on the list of places to visit when they come to washington and very few realize the emotional impact once they get here. the somber lines of people filing past the black granite walls, the names, 58,000 names carved in the wall, you can reach out and touch it and feel it and see your reflection in the shine i black surface, as if to reflect on the war and its impact on american history. a lot of raw emotion here as people remember their loved ones and they leave lists of people they leave little letters, in one case, a 12-pack of beer must have been the favorite of this particular serviceman, leave american flags and notices and letters, a personal connection people have to the names carved in this wall it's not just a monument, it's
ground in the south bay on a memorial aimed at those who served and died in the vietnam war. >>> and team oracle is back on bay area waters today. but this time, they were capsizing on purpose. we'll show you coming up. >>> we're learning more tonight about the unexpected resignation of cia director david petraeus. the retired general stepped down yesterday because of an extramarital affair. it was a breach of trust the general himself called unacceptable. nbc bay area's brian mooar has the story from washington. >> the sudden fall of cia chief david petraeus has washington asking how and why. and the woman suddenly in the spotlight, author paula broadwell, isn't saying. back in january, she was promoting her book on the general. >> he absolutely loves the agency, and i think it's a great place for him. >> broadwell, a west point graduate and arm reserve officer had close access to the cia director. federal agents are investigating whether she had access to his e-mails or computer. >> my understanding is that the fbi's investigation into what took place on computers there did not -- was n
to hold rich natural resources. vietnam and the philippines have claimed other parts of the sea. they are strongly in favor of a legally binding code of conduct, or coc. but china seems reluctant. it apparently believes the coc will limit its maritime activities. before the talks, a chinese government spokesperson said asean should have more important issues to deal with. >> translator: first of all, asean nations should take appropriate measures in order to make progress in the region. they should focus on how they can boost their economic growth. >> now, after the meeting, indones indonesia's foreign minister told reporters that asean and china agreed on the need to take concrete action towards establishing legally binding rules to resolve territorial disputes in the south china sea. however, it seems they failed to agree on when this might happen. and china appears to have a two-pronged strategy when it comes to dealing with asean. it has taken a firm stance against the claims of countries like the philippines and vietnam to islands in the south china sea. but elsewhere, chin
by international law. the philippines, vietnam, and china have been engaged with disputes over islands in the south china sea, including the spratly islands. but chinese prime minister left laos before the regional issues began. >>> up next, "in depth." >>> china's top political and military leaders are meeting in beijing for the 18th communist party congress. over the next week, the elite who control a nation of 1.3 billion people, will reflect on the past and chart a course for the future. here's an in-depth look on what's happening now in china. 2,200 delegates from across the country gathered inside the great hall of the people. they were chosen from more than 80 million party members across china. president hew jintao has led the party as secretary general for the last ten years. the vice president is also in attendance. he's expected to take over the top post from hu on thursday, a day after the congress ends. hu made his final speech as party head. he reflected on his ten-year term and spoke about the challenges awaiting the next leader. hu stressed the need to carry out reforms to stem grow
by china to reinforce its claim to the territory. leaders in vietnam and the philippines argue the islands lie within their borders. but the state-run xinhua news agency reports officials in hainan province issued an ordinance banning foreign ships from stopping in chinese unclaimed waters in the south china sea without permission. the ordinance also prohibits crews aboard those ships from landing on islands in the area. and it stipulates chinese authorities can search any vessels and detain crew members if the ban is violated. the directive also calls on chinese officials to set up police offices on the islands and launch patrols in the area. >>> leaders in the philippines and vietnam have been pushing to resolve the south china sea issue peacefully. but they're pushing back against china's recent moves. the philippine government is the latest to take action over those new chinese passports. it says a dotted line on maps in the passports makes the disputed islands appear as if they belong to china. the chinese government began issuing the passports in may. philippine officials now say the
at the vietnam veterans memorial to honor those who sacrificed their lives during one of the most controversial wars. this year marks the 30th anniversary for the memorial also known as the wall. the names of more than 58,000 americans who died in vietnam are etched into the memorial. >> there's no rank. there's just a name. you don't even have branch of service. the sacrifice is the same no matter whether you were a private or a general. >> when the memorial designed was initially unveiled it was controversial. and now the memorial is one of the sites every year. >> people also gathered at the world war ii memorial. and i was honored to be part of today'sony honoring not only america's greatest generation but also the members who have sacrificed so much to keep america safe. legislation to build the memorial was first introduced back in 1987 but it took about six years for that bill to pass. the memorial finally opened in 2004. >> as times change so does technology including how we share photos and memories with family and friends. an
from the vietnam war. national correspondent steve ste sent any is live with us. >> veteran's affair secretary said each soldier who served in vietnam including himself came home a changed person. in lesser way as visit to the vietnam memorial can also change a person. i was there earlier today. >> everybody has a vietnam memorial on a list of places to visit when they come to washington. very vifew realize the emotiona impact until they get here. walking by the black granite wall the names 50,000 names carved into the wall you can reach out and touch it feel it and see your reflection on the shiny surface as to reflect on the war and impact of the american history. a raw emotion as people remember their loved ones. a case of is 12 pack of beer must have been the favorite of the servicemen they leave american flags and notices and leve letters. it is a personal connection. it is not just a monument it's a living memorial and 30th year after they built and dedicated this monument millions of people nominated here. it is the 30th anniversary of the beginning of the war in vietnam. >> a
. the high-tech exhict in the vietnam memorial in three minutes. >>> they asked congress to stop upcoming spending cuts in education. the teachers group said to set off the fiscal cliff. the automatic budget cuts set for january 1st will mean fewer teachers and programs like head start. >> salaries has been frozen for over five years. we just can't sacrifice education anymore. >> the national education association says in california, the school cuts would affect almost 50,000 special needs students and more than 285,000 students from low-income families. >>> in southern california, the county of san bernardino is thinking of suing the city of san bernardino. facing a 46 million budget shortfall, the city filed for chapter 8 bankruptcy in august. the county says the city owes 1.5 million for dumping trash in the county land phil. yesterday, san bernardino county supervisors voted to seek clarification from the bankruptcy court and file suit if necessary to get their money. >>> another reason to cut back on the sugary sodas. it could increase the man's risk by getting prostate cancer by 40%
conflict, the vietnam war. fox's steve centanni has more on that. >> reporter: the 30th anniversary of the vietnam memorial's dedication and the 50th anniversary of the vietnam war. 4million people visit the vietnam memorial every year, but few were prepared for the emotional impact of seeing the names carved in the black granite or the reflection of your own face staring back. at the ceremony today the secretary of veterans affairs echoed that impression. >> others may have said in touching names you know back in time and connect with those who remain as young and vibrant as when you last saw them and in that instant this granite memorial and the visit or are one. no other monument i know of attains this level of intimacy. >> reporter: a total of 58,000 americans were killed in vietnam. at the world war ii memorial, a more recent addition to the washington landscape, a few 100 world war ii vets were honored. their numbers are dwindling since the war ended 68 years ago. their numbers are now in the 80s and 90s. >> it's great to see the reception the veterans get. we're treated like
fighting in iraq. >>> the vietnam veterans memorial continues to be one of the area's most visited sites in this holiday weekend is no exception. surae chinn talked to veterans who gathered at the wall today. >> i come out twe a year for memorial day and veteran's day. >> i go to my grave remembering, you know. >> reporter: the wall can move people like none other. >> this is charlie. >> reporter: antonio baez came to honor his fallen comrade charlie. >> also the other 50, 60,000 men here and those no longer with us. >> reporter: army specialist baez was only 20 years old while in combat. >> he flew a couple of planes ahead of me. we met and got separated there. >> reporter: his friend would be killed by a land mine at the age of 21. a salute for a fallen friend, a tribute song to a soldier. and faces of young men who never got to grow old. >> to pay respects and homage to all of those that have given their ultimate sacrifice on our wall. all my brothers and sisters. >> reporter: veterans make the annual trek to the wall that bring them right back to the battlefields of vietnam. >> he wa
veterans day in a decade with no american troops officially fighting in iraq. >>> the vietnam veterans memorial continues to be one of the area's most visited and emotional sites. >> surae chinn talked to veterans who gathered at the wall to honor their fallen friends. >> reporter: i come out twice a year for memorial day and veterans day. >> reporter: the wall can move people like none other. antonio has come to honor his fallen comrade charlie. >> not only my friend but all the other 50,000, 60,000 men here and for those who are no longer with us. >> reporter: army specialist biaz was only 20 years old while in combat. >> he flew a couple of planes ahead of me. we met in long bend. we got separated there. >> reporter: his friend would be killed by a land mine at the age of 21. >> a salute for a fallen friend. >> reporter: a tribute song to a soldier. and faces of young men who never got to grow old. >> to pay respects and homage to all those who have given their ultimate sacrifice on that wall. all my brothers and sisters. >> reporter: veterans make the annual trek to the wall that b
, vietnam, iraq, afghanistan, it doesn't work. we go in, have a lot of money, make a lot of temporary friends. they know we're leaving and when we leave, which they know we will leave, they value their lives. so they are our temporary friends. >> were you surprised when petraeus got the cia job? >> i was worried about it because he's created again -- the military crossing into the cia is very dangerous and obviously it's a political job but he's made it into a paramilitary force. he's adopted the predator missiles into the cia. they're using them as drone attacks as well as the pentagon. who knows what else he's up to but certainly his whole concept of counter insurgency violates the sovereignty of every nation on earth. it's a very dangerous position we're putting ourselves into weapon-wise. we can talk about untold history, where we get into the issue of where we're going, america -- >> i'll get to that. on petraeus, when the scandal broke about him having a mistress, is that grounds enough -- >> in england, it is. >> -- for him to resign? >> in england it is. our puritan morality d
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